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Pipeline Pigs in the News

(CBS News) Oct 9, 2013 Okla. pipeline blast sparks huge blaze, spurs evacuations

(FuelFix) Oct. 11, 2013 Keystone Battle Inspires Effort to Tame Process

(Bloomberg) Sept. 11, 2013 Pipeline Safety Chief Says Regulatory Process is 'Kind of Dying.'

(Climate Progress) Sept. 10, 2013 No Keystone? No Problem: TransCanada Pushing Another Major Tar Sands Pipeline

(Reuters) Sept. 10, 2013 U.S Decision on Keystone XL Pipeline to Slip into 2014

(Wall Street Journal on Smart Pigs) Aug. 16, 2013 Oil-Pipeline Cracks Evading Robotic 'Smart Pigs'

 

The Keystone XL Pipeline Project In a nutshell:

The Keystone Pipeline is a major political and environment issue in the United States that has President Barack Obama and his administration in a deadlock with the public and key Keystone officials awaiting the go-ahead to start construction.

Phase I and Phase II of the project are already complete which link Canadian crude oil with refineries in the mid-west. Phase III and Phase IV are the phases of the project that need approval by current administration to move forward. These phases will then link Canadian crude oil with refineries in the Gulf of Mexico. The pipeline would allow 830,000 barrels a day to be transported.

Keystone Pipeline - Source: WIkipedia

Key issues:

Environmental concerns from the physical construction as well as solidifying our dependence on oil in the United States which may lead to further global warming and diminish initiatives for local alternative enegy.

Supporters of the project boast that the added construction jobs - Between 2500 and 4600 temporary construction jobs. As much as 42,000 indirect jobs could be added as a result as well.  

The pipeline will also expand the Gulf refining industry boosting the Gulf local economy as well as bringing increased gasoline supply to the Northeast.

Native Americans on the Issue: The Keystone pipeline would go through about 100 miles of Native American reservations. The existing pipeline already goes through roughly 30 miles of indigenous Canadian land. Native Americans are strongly apposed to the project because it could possibly cause damage to sacred sites, pollution, and water contamination.

The decision is most likely not going to be made until 2014 because of environmental reviews, agency comments on whether the pipeline is of national interest and other regulatory hurdles.